Testing the Huawei Matebook

Huawei Matebook front view with keyboard

Huawei Matebook front view with keyboard

Got my hands on a Huawei Matebook today. Really sweet little laptop/tablet 2-in-1. I can’t believe how thin these things have gotten. It is thinner than my Pixel C! It has an Intel Core M5-6Y54 which is a dual core with hyperthreading 1.1Ghz-2.7Ghz processor, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD and a gorgous 2160p screen. It only has one USB port, a type C that is used for data and charging. It also has a standard 3.5mm headset port. Other than that there is a tiny port where a small set of pins on the keyboard case connect to the device, power button and volume rocker. It looks like the speakers are in the top of the unit, when it is mounted in the case. And there is standard fish-eye webcam port on the front like you’d find on any tablet.

Huawei Matebook keyboard and logo close-up

Huawei Matebook keyboard and logo close-up

It is a 2-in-1 so the it can detach as a tablet. When you flip from horizontal to vertical it doesn’t respond as quickly as I like, but I guess that is better than tablets that jump from one to the other every time you move. The tablet interface does not automatically pull up the keyboard when you touch something like a URL field or similar that requires input. You have to touch the keyboard in the system tray to pull it up. Not sure if that is a default of Windows 10 or something unique to this device. The feels like a slightly less than full size keyboard.  All of the keys are where my fingers expect them to be, no need to relearn typing just for this device.  But, the keyboard is a little ‘springy’ – it is very thin so it sinks in ever so slightly when you type near the middle then springs back up.  This may be because the case is very new so it is a little rigid, or by design.  It didn’t cause any problems, it was just a little noticeable coming from someone who expects a solid keyboard.

Huawei Matebook side view with case

Huawei Matebook side view with case

I’m not much of a Windows user if you hadn’t noticed already. So, I can’t really give much of an unbiased opinion of the OS interface or performance. It does feel snappy, but I felt I needed a benchmark of the system so anyone reading this can compare it to…whatever. So, I used the online benchmark utility from oortonline.gl. It looks like they are using Minecraft for the test. The scores they reported by the Oortonline.gle v0.2.2 test are shown in the table below). For comparison I included the test results from a few other systems. My system at home is a little beefier, but it is running a Xeon that is about 3 years old. The processor is still a monster when it comes to virtualization and the system is all SSD (not nvme), with a GTX 960 and a 4K monitor. It easily outperforms the Matebook, as does a coworker’s i3 desktop, but the system I use day-to-day as my work desktop is a snail in comparison to the Matebook.

Huawei Matebook back view with logo and case

Huawei Matebook back view with logo and case

System Lake Snow Rain Sunset Total
1 1270 1210 1180 1070 4730
2 340 340 320 320 1320
3 2500 2490 2480 2480 9950
4 2480 2470 2490 2480 9920

Systems:

1 – Huawei Matebook – Core M5-6Y54, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD, Intel Onboard Video, Windows 10
2 – Work Linux Desktop – Core i5-660, 8GB RAM, 512GB SSD, GT 210, Xubuntu 14.04.4
3 – Coworker Linux Desktop – Core-i3-3240, 8GB RAM, 120GB SSD, HD 7870, Ubuntu 14.04.3
4 – Home Linux Desktop – Xeon E5-2660 v1, 24GB RAM, 512GB SSD, GTX 860, Xubuntu 16.04

Not the best benchmark test in the world, but it gives you an idea of the system performance. I am fairly certain the test was single threaded and it was browser based since my coworkers system outperformed my home system.  I would have used Phronix since it works on Windows and Linux but apparently Phronix doesn’t want to install on my home Xubuntu 16.04 because of dependency problems. Geekbench is getting me trouble over libstdc++6.so as well. I just love all the little problems with new releases. Until I get that working this is the best you’re going to get from me in regards to performance testing. I do need some general usage testing and of course battery testing.  I’ll either add that to this article later or add a follow up once I have done more testing.

 

Huawei Matebook tablet detatched

Huawei Matebook tablet detatched

I don’t have pricing on the system yet. And, since it is a demo unit I cannot try to install Linux on it. However, Huawei is really Linux friendly on their servers and storage systems to I have asked their reps if it would be okay to test Ubuntu on the system. If they give me the okay I’ll post the results here. Or, I may order a USB Type-C flash drive and use that to test out a live version of Ubuntu/Xubuntu.

Huawei Matebook tablet detatched

Huawei Matebook tablet detatched

Come back in a few days and I will probably have more info on the system. For now, it looks very promising.

Huawei Matebook – Day 2, the Nyan Cat test

Huawei Matebook – Day 3

Huawei Matebook – Day 4, Testing Xubuntu 16.04

Huawei Matebook Windows System Properties

Huawei Matebook Windows System Properties

Huawei Matebook Specs from Windows 10 System Info

Huawei Matebook Specs from Windows 10 System Info

 

 

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